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Is Berberine Nature’s Ozempic? – Exploring the Science

Is Berberine Nature’s Ozempic? – Exploring the Science

May 4, 2024

Curious if berberine is truly a natural alternative to Ozempic? Is Ozempic a good way to lose weight? How does it work? Watch now to find out – Doc is back from touring for his I Disagree Tour and has returned just in time for Part 2 on Ozempic!

As Doc begins outlining the mechanisms of action of Ozempic, he reminds us that neither his doctors, health restoration coaches – or even Doc himself – can give specific medical advice. If you have questions about prescription drugs or any medications, please consult your medical doctor. Doc is here to provide information about the body, and why certain substances work for specific health-related purposes. However, the choices you make as a result of that information are entirely your own.

Other topics covered include:

  • Semaglutides: The European Medicines Agency (the EMA) claims that Ozempic is a semaglutide. What do the EMA and the Mayo Clinic have to say about what semaglutides are and how they work?
  • Is Berberine Really Nature’s Ozempic?: This is the popular claim circulating around social media lately. Is it true? How are berberine and Ozempic similar? How are they different?
  • Doc’s Advised Diet: Many people ask Doc about what type of diet he suggests for weight loss, and his perspective of intermittent fasting. Doc digs into these topics more in depth while giving you a couple of reasonable action steps.
  • Leadership, Longevity, and Influence: In Doc’s Last 10%, he talks about the Leadership and Longevity seminar coming up in three weeks. Why is the seminar important, even if you don’t think you have an area in your life where you fill a leadership role?

See the science-backed research, learn new facts about restoring health, and put yourself on the path to a better life. Watch now for all the details and set up a call with one of our doctors or health restoration coaches here: https://www.thewellnessway.com/clinics/

Join us on Saturdays at 8:00am Central through our website (https://www.thewellnessway.com/adp/), Instagram, Facebook, or X to engage with some of our docs and get your health questions answered!

For further information, check out these resources:

https://www.thewellnessway.com/protein-quality-and-leucine-why-animal-proteins-are-superior/

https://www.thewellnessway.com/protein-for-weight-loss-can-plant-based-work/

https://www.thewellnessway.com/adp/exploring-ozempic-for-weight-loss-pros-cons-and-how-it-works/

https://www.thewellnessway.com/adp/metabolic-syndrome-and-weight-loss-an-easy-answer/

Articles and studies cited in this video:

https://www.ema.europa.eu/en/medicines/human/EPAR/ozempic

https://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements/semaglutide-subcutaneous-route/description/drg-20406730

https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/glp-1-diabetes-and-weight-loss-drug-side-effects-ozempic-face-and-more

Berberine is being called ‘nature’s Ozempic’: Here’s what to know (cnbc.com)

What is berberine, the supplement dubbed ‘nature’s Ozempic’? (nbcnews.com)

Adenosine Monophosphate (AMP)-Activated Protein Kinase: A New Target for Nutraceutical Compounds – PMC (nih.gov)

Berberine and Its Role in Chronic Disease – PubMed (nih.gov)

Berberine: Benefits, supplements, side effects, dosage, and more (medicalnewstoday.com)

Figs: Nutrition, Benefits, and Downsides (healthline.com)

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Disclaimer: This content is for educational purposes only. It’s not intended as a substitute for the advice provided by your Wellness Way clinic or personal physician, especially if currently taking prescription or over-the-counter medications. Pregnant women, in particular, should seek the advice of a physician before trying any herb or supplement listed on this website. Always speak with your individual clinic before adding any medication, herb, or nutritional supplement to your health protocol. Information and statements regarding dietary supplements have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.